linux

build your own computerPreviously, we looked at the importance of choosing a good OS. More specifically, that blog talked about the Windows Embedded platform, an operating system tailor-made for industrial systems, and one that provides a great deal of the functionality that these machines need. It works extremely well on the hardware and can be considered an industry standard. But that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the be-all and end-all of embedded operating systems. There are a number of other choices, some that provide interesting advantages to the end users and OEMs that design with them in mind.

One such OS that can be helpful during the build your own computer process is Linux. The many uses inherent to the platform make it just as flexible as the Windows Embedded platform, and perhaps even more so, due to its variability and open source nature. Linux has been around in embedded systems for some time, but the industry has become somewhat complacent in sticking to closed platforms rather than branching out. We should be looking more in this direction.

What is Linux in the “Build Your Own Computer” Context?

The moniker of the “Old Granddaddy of OS’s” fits the Linux platform. Though Linux was definitely not the first operating system, traced back to Continue Reading…

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Linux Logo - Embedded Computers and LinuxThis might come off as a little much, but where OS is concerned, I like to think of Linux as the people’s champion. It’s free, hardly crashes, and it’s completely open source. It was literally born on the internet, made by the people, for the people and it’s still that way today. It’s not my place to get preachy on the subject as we use Windows on our office PCs, but I’ve seen what people can do with the OS and a lot of our OEM customers use it for their product. And besides, the top 10 fastest super computers using Linux can’t be wrong!

There is a perennial issue, however, that we have to deal with on this matter. Windows is the OS that is in most use by individuals around the world, and the driver support model for Linux is quite different from that of Windows. Rather than the manufacturer providing a barebones driver for their hardware to the customer, they Continue Reading…

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